Greenland, the white island of the Arctic


Scientists from around the world warn that Greenland it melts without delay, but its natural beauties continue to impress in this remote place on the planet that we still have time to visit. Stop at Inuit peoples, embellished with glaciers and contemplate the polar fauna of this white island of Arctic, is a unique experience. Greenland is unlike any other part of the world. That is great nature. In the open. Just thinking that people have survived in such extreme polar cold conditions for over a thousand years is impressive.


Fram is the star ship of Hurtigruten, the Norwegian shipping company that travels the waters of this white Arctic island, the second largest on the planet after Australia, in the summer season. It is not a cruise like those made in the Mediterranean or the Caribbean, here the objective is to discover the world of the inuits and of the icebergs. It is precisely these blocks of ice that float in the sea and the love of the Eskimos who live in these lands that really like Greenland.


In Greenland you may come across more than one surprise. You never know what awaits you at every moment or what your eyes can see. You can suddenly discover the whiplash of a whale's dorsal fin, marvel at the sheer drop of a glacier over the sea or be amazed by a tangled spectacular iceberg for its shape and its bluish colors that are reflected in the sea. The impressions of this great nature always captivate. No one is disappointed.


Kangerlussuag It is the first regular entry stop to Greenland. Some 600 people live on the edge of this former military airport, which the Americans built during World War II to serve as a springboard between the United States and Europe. The inhospitable place is famous for being a magnificent place to contemplate the arctic land fauna and, especially of the musk ox. Only a couple dozen of these woolly herbivores arrived in the 1960s from Canada, but today more than 15,000 grazing across the plain make up another postcard from Greenland.

Greenland: The Land Of Ice Embracing Climate Change | Foreign Correspondent (May 2020)


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